In To Kill a Mockingbird, using Jem and Scout's experiences show the significance and importance of education?  I need to analyze examples that show the importance of education using events where...

In To Kill a Mockingbird, using Jem and Scout's experiences show the significance and importance of education?

 

I need to analyze examples that show the importance of education using events where they are taught a lesson and then they learn from it and use it.

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missy575 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Education is important because we have the opportunity to learn quickly what other people have spent more time learning and build on the body of information making our own lives simpler than those of generations past.

In To Kill a Mockingbird Jem and Scout learn regularly both in and out of the classroom. I think Lee put classroom experiences in the book to demonstrate that often what we learn outside the classroom is more valuable than on the inside, but the inside is an important piece too.

We see this in chapter 2. Scout's first day at school proves to us that Jem thinks he knows more than he really does because he explains the Dewey Decimal System to be a new teaching style. It also proves that you learn to have to deal with people how they are. This is a lesson Scout tries to teach Miss Caroline.

Later in the story, in chapter 26, Scout learns what hypocrisy is when Mrs. Gates has a problem with Hilter but later persecutes blacks when Scout sees her in public.

Outside of education, Scout learns the lessons that we need to walk in other people's shoes (like Boo's, Bob's, and Mayella's). It is important to see life from others' perspectives. She also watches women at the Missionary Tea in chapter 24 be terribly hypocritical.

Throughout the story, but mostly after the trial, Scout learns life lessons from Miss Maudie and Atticus. Anytime Scout is talking with either of them, a moral about how we treat others, courage, or justice arises. Each instance when the mockingbird is addressed demonstrates that people should be considered innocent until proven guilty. Scout and Jem also learn through the trial that the adult world's perspective is tainted by their biases.

 

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