In The Catcher in the Rye, why doesn't Holden like Jesus' disciples?

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After referring to himself as "sort of an atheist," Holden gets out of bed and attempts to pray but cannot. Holden goes on to mention that he likes Jesus but the Disciples annoy the hell out of him. Holden feels that the Disciples were not much help to Jesus while...

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After referring to himself as "sort of an atheist," Holden gets out of bed and attempts to pray but cannot. Holden goes on to mention that he likes Jesus but the Disciples annoy the hell out of him. Holden feels that the Disciples were not much help to Jesus while He was alive and says that they were about as useful to Jesus as "a hole in the head." Holden says that he likes almost any person in the Bible better than the Disciples and mentions that he used to get into huge arguments with a boy named Arthur Childs over the issue. Arthur Childs told Holden that if he didn't like the Disciples, it meant that he didn't like Jesus either. Holden responded by telling Arthur that he was completely wrong in his assessment and said that he didn't blame Jesus for picking the Disciples at random because He didn't have time to go around analyzing everybody. Overall, Holden views the Disciples as useless, untrustworthy individuals, who were no help to Jesus. Fittingly, Holden admires Jesus, who lived a holy life and died for a genuine cause. 

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In Chapter 14, Holden explains at length why he doesn't like the disciples of Jesus. In this chapter he talks about his feelings concerning religion and why he likes Jesus, but he has no time for his disciples. Holden looks at what the Bible says about them and decides that they are "phony," which is of course his favourite adjective used to describe the superficial, insincere nature of adults around him:

Take the Disciples, for instance. They annoy the hell out of me, if you want to know the truth. They were all right after Jesus was dead and all, but while He was alive, they were about as much use to Him as a hole in the head. All they did was keep letting Him down. I like almost anybody in the Bible better than the Disciples.

He goes on to say that if it had been up to the diciples, Judas would have been sent to hell for his betrayal, whereas Jesus didn't do this. Holden doesn't like the disciples of Jesus therefore because, to him, they sum up what is wrong with the various people in his world that he tries to connect with: they are phony and cannot be trusted, as they kept "letting [Jesus] down." Holden is desperately trying to find somebody who he can connect with in a meaningful way, and the disciples' inability to support Jesus and stick by him make them symbols of phoniness and all that is wrong with the world.

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Holden's biggest gripe in The Catcher in the Rye is "phony" (fake) people. Holden criticizes and judges everyone with whom he comes in contact, and that includes characters in books such as Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, and even the disciples from The Holy Bible. He recounts a discussion that he had about the disciples with a classmate from Whooton School named Arthur Childs who was a Quaker. Childs tells Holden that he should like the disciples simply because Jesus chose them to help him out. Holden must have found something fake or phoney with the disciples, because that is what he usually finds annoying in people. Holden never says that in particular, but he does say the following:

"Take the Disciples for instance. They annoy the hell out of me, if you want to know the truth. They were all right after Jesus was dead and all, but while He was alive, they were about as much use to Him as a hole in the head. All they did was keep letting Him down" (99).

One can infer that if Holden thinks that the disciples let Jesus down all of the time that they were flaky, flighty, or phony in his eyes. It would seem that Holden identifies with Jesus and the feeling of having people let him down all of the time; then, he projects this onto the disciples and that's why he doesn't like them.

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