Why does Wolfsheim mourn the passing of Metropole?

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In chapter 4, Nick Carraway travels into the city with his enigmatic neighbor, Jay Gatsby, and the two men meet for lunch in a "well-fanned Forty-second Street cellar." Shortly after entering the restaurant, Jay Gatsby introduces Nick to one of his business associates named Meyer Wolfshiem. Nick describes Meyer Wolfshiem as a "flat-nosed Jew" with a rather large head and piercing eyes. The men then order a few highballs and Meyer comments that he likes the restaurant but enjoys the one across the street more. When Gatsby says that the restaurant across the street is too hot, Meyer agrees but comments that the Metropole is full of memories. Meyer then proceeds to mourn the death of his friend, Rosy Rosenthal, who was murdered outside of the Metropole at four in the morning. Nick Carraway remembers hearing about the murder and mentions that all five criminals involved were electrocuted. Meyer's comments about his friend Rosy Rosenthal reveal that he is in involved in the criminal underworld and hint that Gatsby is also involved in illegal business ventures.

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It's interesting to note that while he pines for the past and his friends from before, he shows relatively little remorse upon the passing of Gatsby.  For whatever reason, his current associates simply do not measure up to his past; Gatsby's death results in nothing more than business as usual for Meyer.

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The Metropole was the sight where he lost his friend, Rosy Rosenthal, who was murdered outside the Meropole. He also laments over the way things used to be. Friends who are now dead, good times now past. As he gets older, he reflects on those who have left his life, and all the "good" years that are now gone.

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