Children of Blood and Bone

by Tomi Adeyemi
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Why does Tomi Adeyemi tell Children of Blood and Bone from three different viewpoints? Why doesn’t Tzain narrate part of the story?

The three perspectives create a deeper, more dramatic story.

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While we can't know exactly why Tomi Adeyemi chose to write from multiple points of view instead of keeping a singular narrator in Children of Blood and Bone, we can discuss some of the effects this stylistic choice has.

First of all, this allows the author to explore a...

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While we can't know exactly why Tomi Adeyemi chose to write from multiple points of view instead of keeping a singular narrator in Children of Blood and Bone, we can discuss some of the effects this stylistic choice has.

First of all, this allows the author to explore a wider variety of events and histories. This lets readers learn much more about the political, historical, and social aspects of Orisha than we would know with just one narrator. Through the three perspectives, we can truly experience what it is like to be a maji like Zelie, what Amari lives with as a second-born royal, and what Inan struggles with as both a future king and a secret maji. If the story were only told from one perspective, we would lose all of this insight into the other two characters and what they know about their home.

Furthermore, the switch between narrators creates much more tension and drama in the plot. Knowing what Zelie's plan is from her chapters makes it even more tense when we travel with Inan as he chases her. Knowing Inan's internal conflict helps us feel even more tension when he and Zelie meet throughout the story.

Overall, the switching of narrators creates interest, tension, and depth in the novel.

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