Why does the poet believe that “ whole libraries that no one / got around to writing" is “more disturbing than book ashes"? Do you agree with him?

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In "Burning a Book," William Stafford equates those unwritten texts represented in the quote with ignorance.

The first part of the poem describes the burning of a book and makes a profound insight that

Truth, brittle and faint, burns easily, its fire as hot as the fire lies...

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In "Burning a Book," William Stafford equates those unwritten texts represented in the quote with ignorance.

The first part of the poem describes the burning of a book and makes a profound insight that

Truth, brittle and faint, burns easily,
its fire as hot as the fire lies make—
flame doesn’t care.

In other words, fire doesn't distinguish between good and bad writing, or writing that contains "truth" and writing that is based on "lies." Either way, the books will be destroyed, save a few words that remain in the ashes. So, one way we can lose "truth" or knowledge is through the burning of books that have already been written.

It's the other way that we can lose knowledge that concerns Stafford in the lines you quoted. The full excerpt reads as follows:

More disturbing
than book ashes are whole libraries that no one
got around to writing—desolate
towns, miles of unthought in cities,
and the terrorized countryside where wild dogs
own anything that moves. If a book
isn’t written, no one needs to burn it—
ignorance can dance in the absence of fire.

Stafford finds it "more disturbing" that so many ideas go unexpressed but also that so many people are seemingly incapable of recording their ideas due to, probably, illiteracy. When he references "the terrorized countryside, where wild dogs" seem to rule, Stafford implies that in that uncivilized region, education and knowledge are not the top priority. If this continues, though, "ignorance can dance in the absence of fire." In that scenario, there is no need for fire to burn books; ignorance does the job of destroying the presence of "truth" and insight just as well.

Finally, Stafford ends the poem by including himself in the guilty parties:

So I’ve burned books. And there are many
I haven’t even written, and nobody has.

Stafford acknowledges that even though he is a writer, he has texts left unwritten, ideas left unexplored. Other people have also not written books that could add to wealth of human knowledge. This, to Stafford, is even more tragic than burning books.

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