Why does the narrator continue to write even against her husband's wishes? What does this show the reader about her character? Use evidence to support your response.

The narrator continues to write against her husband's wishes because she disagrees with his ideas about the rest cure. Contrary to what he thinks, the narrator believes that congenial work, with excitement and change, will do her good. And so she continues to write, even if it means she has to be a bit sneaky about it.

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Writing is clearly a very important activity for the narrator, even more so now that she's cooped up inside all day without anything else to do. Writing provides her with a much-needed creative outlet and gives her the opportunity to share her innermost thoughts, even if it's with a diary...

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Writing is clearly a very important activity for the narrator, even more so now that she's cooped up inside all day without anything else to do. Writing provides her with a much-needed creative outlet and gives her the opportunity to share her innermost thoughts, even if it's with a diary rather than a real-life human being.

Many doctors would see such activity as therapeutic, and think it was something that can aid a patient's recovery. But not the narrator's husband. He's of the opinion that his wife must not engage in any kind of work, including writing, until she's completely well again. For good measure, the narrator's brother, also a physician, says the same thing.

However, the narrator respectfully disagrees with them. And so, for the time being, she continues to write. This tells us that she's a lot stronger in mind and body than her husband and brother seem to think she is. This is a woman who knows her own mind and is certain that she knows what is good for her:

Personally, I disagree with their ideas.

Personally, I believe that congenial work, with excitement and change, would do me good.

Nonetheless, she does find the process of writing somewhat draining. As she readily admits, it does exhaust her a good deal. In any case, the very fact that the narrator is writing at all is a testament to the inner strength of her character, something that her brother and husband never get to see.

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