Why does the grandmother call the Misfit a "good man" in "A Good Man is Hard to Find" by Flannery O'Connor?

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The grandmother calls the Misfit a good man because she is trying desperately to save herself. She uses the protections that have served her throughout her life. She tries to offer the Misfit money, which is pointless, as he can simply kill her and take it (as he point outs)....

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The grandmother calls the Misfit a good man because she is trying desperately to save herself. She uses the protections that have served her throughout her life. She tries to offer the Misfit money, which is pointless, as he can simply kill her and take it (as he point outs). She also tries to appeal to his sense of honor by appealing to the idea that he should behave like a gentleman because she is clearly a lady. This comes from her lifelong belief that being a "lady" will protect her from the worst evils in life.

Faced with a mass murderer, the grandmother is stripped of her false protections. As she faces death, neither money nor her status can save her. It is only when she faces the reality of her own vulnerability that she can experience a moment of grace and see the Misfit as her own son and as a being loved by God.

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At this point in Flannery O'Connor's short story "A Good Man is Hard to Find," the grandmother is trying to make an appeal to The Misfit's good side in an effort to survive her encounter. At this desperate moment, the grandmother recognizes that The Misfit holds all the power in his hands; she is absolutely powerless to stop him from killing her, so she resorts to empty flattering comments in a last-ditch effort to change his mind.

The grandmother's words at this moment in the story link directly to the title of the short story, turning a clichéd observation about humanity in general into a darkly comic inside joke of sorts. By the end of the story, after observing the grandmother's interaction with The Misfit in the moments before her death, the reader has insight into the title; a good man is indeed hard to find, especially if one has the bad luck to encounter a murderous psychopath while traveling with one's family.

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The grandmother calls the Misfit a "good man" in the end because she is trying to persuade him not to shoot her. She attempts to appeal to his values, hoping that they are the same as hers, crying, "I know you wouldn't shoot a lady!" She even says to him, "You're not a bit common!" By telling him these things, the grandmother hopes that she can appeal to their shared values—assuming that he also places a high premium on being "a good man" and treating a "lady" a certain way—that she can show him how similar they are (though they really are not). It is also possible that she is flattering him, assuming again that he has the same values and that he would be flattered by her claiming him in this way. However, they obviously do not share the same values, and this kind of flattery does not work on him.

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One of the most baffling moments in Flannery O'Conner's "A Good Man is Hard to Find" occurs near the end, when the grandmother insists the Misfit is a "good man" despite repeated examples to the contrary. It's never explicitly stated why the grandmother persists in doing so, but we can make at least two assumptions regarding her motivations based on the context. First, it seems like the grandmother is trying to flatter the Misfit by calling him a good man and, in doing so, convince him to stop murdering her family members.  Second, by calling the Misfit a "good man," the grandmother could also be trying to convince herself of this fact. Panicking in a dreadful situation, the grandmother appears to be grasping at any kind of security available to her, even if that means clinging to an increasingly absurd fantasy that the Misfit is a "good man." Therefore, with these two ideas in mind, the grandmother's interactions with the Misfit become more and more desperate. 

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