Why does the bridegroom make such a strong point of his love for his wife in “The Other Woman”?

In “The Other Woman,” the bridegroom makes such a strong point of his love for his wife because he's trying to make himself out to be a fundamentally decent man, despite his being a philanderer.

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The central figure in “The Other Woman ” is an adulterer who has cheated on his fiancée with a woman who works at a cigar store and newspaper stand. What makes this sordid little encounter all the more shabby is the fact that it took place not long before...

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The central figure in “The Other Woman” is an adulterer who has cheated on his fiancée with a woman who works at a cigar store and newspaper stand. What makes this sordid little encounter all the more shabby is the fact that it took place not long before the man was due to be married. He hasn't even started married life and he's already straying.

And yet he's incredibly anxious to tell the listener, the narrator of the story, that he still loves his wife. In fact, he not only loves her but he's in love with her, as he tells us in the very first words of the story.

At various points in the story, the man is at pains to tell his interlocutor how highly he regards his wife. As well as saying that he is in love with her, he talks in romantic terms about how, when sitting by the moonlight, he wanted to dream about her. Later on, he waxes lyrical about the “sweet and fine” letter his fiancée had written to him, in which she expressed her love for him and how happy she was that their marriage was near at hand.

In all of this, the man is protesting too much. In other words, he's expressing his love for his wife so strongly that people start suspecting that he's not being genuine, that he's not really telling the truth. He wants everyone to think that he loves his wife, that he adores her, and is deeply in love with her. But the exaggerated manner in which he expresses his feelings, not to mention his affair, would appear to suggest otherwise.

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