Why does the author say that the birthmark was strongly interwoven?

The narrator of the story describes the birthmark as "deeply interwoven" because it seems to be so much more than skin-deep. The mark is literally on her skin, but it symbolizes human frailty and mortality. We are fundamentally, and by nature, imperfect. Georgiana is perfect in every other way. It also seems to symbolize the "magic endowments" of her beautiful personality. Thus, when the birthmark disappears, Georgiana is no more.

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The narrator says that the birthmark is "deeply interwoven" with Georgiana's skin because it is always there and has always been there. She was born with it. When she is calm, it stands out: a deep crimson hand print in miniature on her cheek. When she blushes, her fair skin...

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The narrator says that the birthmark is "deeply interwoven" with Georgiana's skin because it is always there and has always been there. She was born with it. When she is calm, it stands out: a deep crimson hand print in miniature on her cheek. When she blushes, her fair skin grows more pink and the mark seems to blend in, but it is always there. If anything causes the young woman to grow pale, the mark then grows "fearful[ly]" distinct against her pallor, according to her husband, Aylmer. The narrator even acknowledges the belief some people have that a fairy "had laid her tiny hand upon [Georgiana's] cheek" when she was just an infant and left this print there as a sign of Georgina's lovely and magical nature with which she wins over everyone.

Further, the birthmark itself seems to symbolize human frailty and mortality, hinted at as a result of the shape—a tiny human hand. The narrator says,

It was the fatal flaw of humanity, which Nature, in one shape or another, stamps ineffaceably on all her productions, either to imply that they are temporary and finite, or that their perfection must be wrought by toil and pain.

In short, humans cannot be perfect: we are always flawed, we always age and wither, and we always die. If nothing else, our temporal and finite nature makes us imperfect. For this reason as well, the birthmark can be described as "deeply interwoven"; it represents Georgiana's imperfect nature as a human being, without which she cannot exist. This is why she perishes when it disappears.

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