Why does Romeo bury Paris with Juliet?

Romeo buries Paris with Juliet to honor Paris's dying wish. Romeo grants this wish because he feels no animosity for Paris and regards him as a companion in misfortune.

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Romeo buries Paris with Juliet because this is Paris's dying wish. Grief and misery, rather than any quarrel, lead Romeo and Paris to fight, and when Romeo kills Paris, he bears him no ill-will. He did not even know whom he was fighting until he looks at the dead man's...

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Romeo buries Paris with Juliet because this is Paris's dying wish. Grief and misery, rather than any quarrel, lead Romeo and Paris to fight, and when Romeo kills Paris, he bears him no ill-will. He did not even know whom he was fighting until he looks at the dead man's face and recognizes him as a kinsman of Mercutio's. When he does so, he feel a spirit of fraternity with Paris as "one writ with me in sour misfortune's book."

The final fight between Romeo and Paris is often cut from productions and films of the play. This is partly because it clutters the stage. The director usually wants an image of the two lovers together in death—a final tableau which is spoiled by the intrusion of Paris.

However, Romeo's magnanimous attitude towards his rival, even to the point of laying him with Juliet in the tomb, illustrates an important point in the play. Love stories are often stories of rivalry, but Romeo and Juliet have no competitors for each other's love, which is completely devoid of jealousy. Romeo never for a moment worries about Juliet preferring another man to him. Fate, not Paris, is Romeo's antagonist, and he feels only pity and sorrow for the death of another man who loved Juliet.

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