Why does Ralph cry at the end of Lord of the Flies?

Ralph cries at the end of Lord of the Flies because he has finally been rescued the nightmare that life on the island has become. Ralph has been through a terrible ordeal, and it stands to reason that he would weep after everything he's been through. He also cries for the loss of innocence and for the darkness of man's heart.

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Ralph cries at the end of Lord of the Flies for a number of reasons. Primarily, it's a release of all the emotions he's been bottling up inside him for so long. Now that his ordeal is finally over, Ralph no longer has to worry about showing weakness to the...

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Ralph cries at the end of Lord of the Flies for a number of reasons. Primarily, it's a release of all the emotions he's been bottling up inside him for so long. Now that his ordeal is finally over, Ralph no longer has to worry about showing weakness to the other boys. He can be himself; he can be true to his emotions. In short, he can be a boy again, instead of having to pretend to be an adult.

Ralph also sheds tears for the loss of innocence of both himself and the other boys on the island. Life will never be the same again for any of the boys now that some of their number have died and others are responsible for their deaths. When these youngsters first crash-landed on this remote desert island, they were boys. But in a very short period of time, they have been turned into men, and this has been a very traumatic experience for Ralph, who has had to grow up more quickly than just about anyone.

Due to his many traumatic experiences on the island, Ralph has been given a terrifying glimpse of the evil that men do and of the depths of darkness to which man can descend. This makes him weep, as do memories of his "true, wise friend," Piggy, whose death, more than any other event on the island, illustrates the darkness of man's heart.

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