why does a positively charged balloon will stick to a wall just as easily as a negatively charged balloon?why does a positively charged balloon will stick to a wall just as easily as a negatively...

why does a positively charged balloon will stick to a wall just as easily as a negatively charged balloon?

why does a positively charged balloon will stick to a wall just as easily as a negatively charged balloon?

device that protects other devices by controlling static electric charges?

would a negatively charged balloon stick to a metal wall as easily as to a wooden wall?

Asked on by diana1236

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ndnordic | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted on

When you bring a charged object, such as your balloon, near a neutral object that is classified as an insulator, then a temporary charge is induced in the neutral object.  If the charged object is positive, then electrons in the neutral object will be attracted toward the charged object, creating a temporary imbalance of charges in the neutral object. Because the surface toward the charged balloon is the opposite charge of the balloon, the opposite charges attract. The same is true if the balloon is negatively charged. Then the electrons in the neutral object will be repelled by the balloon, and the balloon will "see" or experience, a temporary positive charge. Again, the opposite charges will attract.

The way static charges are normally controlled is to have metal strips, conductors, in the area where the static charges are expected to build up. The metal strips are connected to the ground. The electrons can easily flow through the metal to the ground and are thus harmlessly dissipated. This is the same principle used in a lightning rod to protect a house or other buildings.

Charged balloons would not stick to a metal as easily as to wood because the electrons in the metal are so free to move about, either into the balloon neutralizing a positive charge, or from the balloon into the metal dissipating the negative charge of the balloon.

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