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John Proctor represents a threat to Reverend Parris's power. Parris has established himself in Salem as a man of great spiritual and temporal authority. And that authority has been burnished by the leading role he's played in the rapidly-developing witch hysteria that has the town firmly in its grasp. So...

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John Proctor represents a threat to Reverend Parris's power. Parris has established himself in Salem as a man of great spiritual and temporal authority. And that authority has been burnished by the leading role he's played in the rapidly-developing witch hysteria that has the town firmly in its grasp. So long as the witch-hunt continues, Parris will continue to enjoy the prestige that his elevated role in the judicial proceedings has given him. In other words, Parris has a vested interest in things going on just as they are.

John Proctor threatens all of that. Exposing the witch hysteria as being based on nothing but a pack of lies will seriously damage Parris's credibility in the eyes of the townsfolk. Salem is Parris's whole life as much as it is Proctor's; it's all he knows. His whole identity, his whole being is bound up with the life of the town. He's worked hard to achieve a position of social prominence and respect. But all that will come crashing down about his ears if John Proctor's allowed to expose what's really been going on in Salem. It's no wonder, then, that Parris hates him so much. And no wonder that, under the circumstances, Parris feels he has no choice but to destroy Proctor.

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In my opinion, Parris hates John Proctor because Proctor opposes his efforts to make himself more important.

Parris is very interested in increasing the prestige of his office (that of the minister for the town) and, thereby, his own prestige.  But Proctor has opposed these efforts.  He has, for example, opposed the efforts to have fancy candlesticks for the altar of the church.  Parris sees this opposition as an attack on him personally.

So Proctor makes Parris hate him by opposing Parris's attempts to make himself seem more important.

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