1984 Questions and Answers
by George Orwell

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In 1984, why does Orwell include such long passages from Goldstein’s book? 

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Although he writes a well-crafted novel full of allusions and with a protagonist, Winston, who changes and grows due to his love for Julia, Orwell's primary purpose in 1984 is didactic. This means Orwell wants to educate his audience. He is trying to teach us how badly power can be abused if put in the wrong hands. His is a cautionary tale, advising readers to safeguard how words and language are used, to avoid a surveillance state, to support a free press, and to hold tightly onto democratic norms. He is trying to make as clear as possible that the alternative—a totalitarian dictatorship—means misery for most people.

For this reason, Orwell includes long passages from Goldstein's book in 1984. He wants the reader to know from a source outside of Winston's incomplete, subjective consciousness what the aims of the state of Oceania truly are. Orwell wants us to know that the misery and endless warfare in which people in 1984 live are not necessary or accidental, but deliberately manufactured...

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