In A Doll's House, why does Nora say that she would like to tear her costume in a million pieces?

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The fancy-dress costume that Nora was planning to wear for a dinner party symbolizes the fake nature of her marriage. For years, Nora has been acting out the role of loyal, devoted housewife, a role which she's been forced to perform by her husband, Torvald . But now she realizes...

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The fancy-dress costume that Nora was planning to wear for a dinner party symbolizes the fake nature of her marriage. For years, Nora has been acting out the role of loyal, devoted housewife, a role which she's been forced to perform by her husband, Torvald. But now she realizes that her whole marriage is nothing but a sham and that she's been treated like an overgrown doll all this time. Nora's resolution to tear up her costume is a recognition that she's a grown woman, someone who will no longer put on an identity made for her by other people. It's time for her to forge a new identity of her own, one that expresses her true self as a free, independent woman.

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When Nora says she’d like to tear her costume up in a million pieces, I think we can come up with two distinct interpretations. One interpretation could lead us to see that she is tired of “playing dress up” in her marriage to Torvald. She has been keeping secrets from him for many years, namely about the loan she secured under suspect conditions, and she is finally ready to stop hiding things from Torvald and acting in a role. Another interpretation could be a bit more global or universal: Ibsen certainly commented on the treatment of women in the late 1800’s, and this shredding of Nora’s costume could represent breaking the restrictions that society placed on women . 

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