Rebecca Questions and Answers
by Daphne Du Maurier

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In Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier, why does the narrator-heroine remain nameless and is this namelessness symbolic in anyway?

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In Daphne Du Maurier's Rebecca, the narrator remains nameless in order to convey the overpowering essence of Rebecca, Maxim's dead wife and former mistress of Manderley; and to display without question the narrator's complete lack of power in her new home.

When she becomes Maxim de Winter's second wife, she believes that she will become the mistress of his home: not in a way that she will command others, but that she will bring their home to life, resurrecting joy and pleasure to her new husband's life. (She has no way of knowing that these things were not present when Rebecca was alive: his life was a living hell.) However, even the house seems to conspire against her fondest desire—it is as unwelcoming as a jealous woman:

There was Manderley, our Manderley, secretive and silent as it had always been...As I stood there, hushed and still, I could swear that the house was not an empty shell but lived and breathed as it had lived before...

While Maxim seems to love his new wife, he is...

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