Why does Miss Maudie hate her house?

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After Miss Maudie's home burns down in chapter 8, Jem and Scout visit her the next day and offer her their condolences. Miss Maudie demonstrates her ability to see the positive side of bad situations by saying that she always wanted a smaller home anyway and is glad to...

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After Miss Maudie's home burns down in chapter 8, Jem and Scout visit her the next day and offer her their condolences. Miss Maudie demonstrates her ability to see the positive side of bad situations by saying that she always wanted a smaller home anyway and is glad to finally have a larger yard. Miss Maudie then reveals that she hated her old home by telling Jem,

"Why, I hated that old cow barn. Thought of settin‘ fire to it a hundred times myself, except they’d lock me up" (Lee, 75).

One of the main reasons Miss Maudie claims to have hated her old home is because she has an affinity for being outside and gardening. Miss Maudie cannot stand being cooped up in her home and would prefer to spend the majority of her waking hours outside. Her affinity for being outdoors and desire to have a smaller home, which would give her a bigger yard, help ease the pain of losing her house in a fire. The children are also impressed by Miss Maudie's positive attitude and ability to look at the brighter side of things following her house fire.

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I don't believe that Miss Maudie hates her house at all.  When her house burns, she remains true to her character and demonstrates true courage to Jem and Scout.  Her quiet reserve with which she handles the burning of her house should not be mistaken as a hatred for her house.  Miss Maudie is a character who enjoys the outside more than being "locked up" within the confines of her house.  Although she is sad over her loss, she doesn't lament over her fate; rather, she tells Jem and Scout that she will rebuild a smaller house so that she will have more room to garden and grow her flowers. 

So you see, it's not that she hates her house, it's just that she looks upon the burning of her home in an optimistic light, which is now she will have more space and time to spend on the things she enjoys such as her gardens and flowers. 

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