Why does Ligarius come to see Brutus in Julius Caesar?

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Towards the end of act 2, scene 1, Lucius brings Caius Ligarius to Brutus. Ligarius is in poor health. Because of his infirmity, Brutus had not thought to include him as an active player in the conspiracy to kill Julius Caesar . However, Ligarius has hated Julius Caesar ever since...

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Towards the end of act 2, scene 1, Lucius brings Caius Ligarius to Brutus. Ligarius is in poor health. Because of his infirmity, Brutus had not thought to include him as an active player in the conspiracy to kill Julius Caesar. However, Ligarius has hated Julius Caesar ever since the dictator publicly insulted him for his support of Pompey. Ligarius has come to tell Brutus that he will put his sickness aside if it means participating in the assassination of the dictator.

By all the gods that Romans bow before,
I here discard my sickness! Soul of Rome,
Brave son derived from honorable loins,
Thou, like an exorcist, hast conjured up
My mortifièd spirit. Now bid me run,
And I will strive with things impossible,
Yea, get the better of them. What’s to do? (Act 2, Scene 1, 330-337)
Brutus is happy to receive Ligarius into the plot. Metellus had spoken of Ligarius and his ill feelings towards Julius Caesar. Brutus feels that he needs all the help that he can get with the conspiracy. He is happy that Ligarius is able to help, feeble though he may be. Ligarius does not take part in the actual murder of Julius Caesar, but he does enthusiastically throw his support behind Brutus and join the ranks of the conspirators.
While Shakespeare does not include much detail about Ligarius, we know of him from several historical sources. Cicero and Plutarch record that Ligarius supported Pompey in the African campaign. After the war, Ligarius was exiled from Rome before eventually being allowed to return. It is unclear exactly what role the historic Ligarius played in the conspiracy, but Shakespeare decided to include him in this scene to show how motivating a leader Brutus can be.
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