In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, why does Juliet go to Friar Laurence's cell?

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In Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, we actually see Juliet go to Friar Laurence's cell twice.

The first time she goes to Friar Laurence's cell is to marry Romeo. In Act 2, Romeo devises the plan that if Juliet has permission from her parents to go to Friar Laurence's cell for confession, then they can be married that morning, the morning after they meet. Nurse acts as Juliet's messenger for Romeo's plans and we see that Romeo has laid out this plan when we see Nurse say the lines:

Have you got leave to go to shrift to-day?
...
Then hie you hence to Friar Laurence's cell;
There stays a husband to make you a wife. (II.v.68-71)

The word "shrift" can be translated as "confession," showing us that Romeo's plan is for Juliet to meet him at Friar...

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