Why does Johnny think Dally is a hero in Chapter 5 of The Outsiders? Do you think Dally is a hero based on what he did?

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Johnny thinks that Dally is a hero because of Dally's deep loyalty to his fellow Greasers. Dally expresses this innate loyalty through acts of self-sacrifice.

Additionally, Johnny thinks of Dally as a man of honor, someone who will never betray a fellow Greaser. To Johnny, Dally is "real," a man...

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Johnny thinks that Dally is a hero because of Dally's deep loyalty to his fellow Greasers. Dally expresses this innate loyalty through acts of self-sacrifice.

Additionally, Johnny thinks of Dally as a man of honor, someone who will never betray a fellow Greaser. To Johnny, Dally is "real," a man who will watch his back in a dangerous and often violent world. To emphasize his point, Johnny relates that Dally didn't expose Two-Bit when the police came looking for the kid who broke the school building windows. Instead, Dally quietly submitted to being arrested. He took the blame for Two-Bit's actions. Johnny sees Dally's actions as heroic.

Similarly, when Ponyboy and Johnny go on the run, it is Dally who helps the boys. He gives them $50 and a gun for protection. Then, he tells them to hide out at an abandoned church until he comes for them. Indeed, Dally does keep his word. He later visits the boys and takes them out for a meal at a local Dairy Queen.

Later in the story, Dally does what heroes do: at great personal risk to his life, he pulls both Johnny and Ponyboy from a burning church. Johnny thinks of Dally as a hero because the latter is willing to sacrifice his own comfort and safety for others.

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Johnny idolizes Dally even before his discussion with Ponyboy concerning the novel Gone With the Wind. But after reading the Margaret Mitchell novel, Johnny begins comparing Dally with the "Southern gentlemen--impressed with their manners and charm." Although Pony disagrees, declaring that Soda is more like a Southern gentleman than Dally, Johnny tells about the time Dally took the blame for Two-Bit for breaking out windows at the school. Dally didn't rat out his friend, and he went to jail, taking

"the sentence without battin' an eye or even denyin' it. That's gallant."

To Pony,

Dally was real... Dally was so real he scared me.

Although I don't see that Dally was any kind of hero for going to jail for a crime he did not commit, Dally does show heroism when he goes into the fire to save Johnny, risking his life for his buddy. Dally more closely resembles an anti-hero, but even anti-heroes are prone to acts of bravery once in a while.

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