Why does John see his relationship with Lenina like that of Romeo and Juliet and then later like that of Othello and Desdemona? Ch. 13 Brave New World

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For someone like John who has always been an outsider—belonging to the Savage community—he takes much of his knowledge from the age-old writer William Shakespeare—so much so that he tends to analyze his relationship with Lenina like Romeo and Juliet and Othello and Desdemona.

Initially, John foresees Lenina as someone who can be wholly devoted to him—like Juliet to Romeo. However, this does not seem to be the case. Unlike John, Lenina has been brought up in a way where she believes that everyone belongs to everyone, and thus the concept of monogamy and loyalty does not exist for her.

Here's a conversation between Lenina and her friend Fanny from chapter 3 of the book which highlights this fact:

Dr. Wells says that a three months' Pregnancy Substitute now will make all the difference to my health for the next three or four years.

Well, I hope he's right," said Lenina. "But, Fanny, do you really mean to say that for the next three months you're not supposed to…

Here, Lenina is...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 697 words.)

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