Why does the House of Usher remind the Narrator of "old wood-work"? It is in crumbling condition and yet remarkablly stable. It is many centuries old. It is remarkably delicate in the...

Why does the House of Usher remind the Narrator of "old wood-work"?

It is in crumbling condition and yet remarkablly stable. It is many centuries old. It is remarkably delicate in the flourishes of its architecture. It is brown in color.

Asked on by jlvperez

1 Answer | Add Yours

ms-mcgregor's profile pic

ms-mcgregor | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

In the fifth paragraph of the story, the narrator looks at the House of Usher and writes that the house," reminded me of the specious totality of old wood-work which has rotted for long years in some neglected vault, with no disturbance from the breath of the external air." In other words, the house mirrors Roderick's appearance. He has been rotting for years in his neglected house and apparently not been outside in the fresh air for months.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,917 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question