Why does Hamlet procrastinate? Why does Hamlet procrastinate?

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I'm not sure I would call it procrastination; instead, I would call it hesitation.  Procrastination generally happens when we don't want to do something (such as cleaning the bathroom, pulling weeds, paying bills, or whatever task you might find unpleasant).  Hamlet clearly wants to do something even before he discovers his "gut" instinct is true--that Claudius killed his father.  Once he's reasonably sure about that, he is resolved.  His hesitancy, it seems, is moral.  Hamlet is not a man who would kill easily and without cause, yet we know he is resolved because he inadvertently kills Polonius thinking it's Claudius.  Hamlet is a moral man who understands the consequences of murder; thus, he is hesitant to commit the act easily. 

There are several factors to consider in order to understand Hamlet's actions or his inaction.

First, the play takes place in a Catholic world.  Both murder and suicide are mortal sins.  Hamlet's dilemma is how to accomplish his goal, avenging his father's...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 839 words.)

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