Why does Hamlet find avenging his father's death so difficult? Why doesn't he take decisive action as soon as he seems convinced of Claudius's guilt?

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The simple answer is that as a result of the play-within-the-play, Hamlet has definite proof of his uncle's guilt. He comes upon Clausius alone, and it would seem logical that the only thing that keeps Hamlet from killing him then and there is his scruple about sending Claudius to his Maker when (so Hamlet assumes) he is making his confession. This makes Hamlet appear hideously vengeful - as evil an executioner as Claudius was a...

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