Why does granddaddy become involved in the story's conflict? Why is his way of handling the conflict successful when granny is not?

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Granddaddy becomes involved in the story's conflict because Granny asks him to. Because she hasn't been successful in getting the men off their property, Granny decides to enlist Granddaddy Cain's help. One of the children, Cathy, feels that Granddaddy's tall stature and kingly demeanor make him stand out. People are naturally drawn to him.

Essentially, Granddaddy's success in handling the conflict is due to his formidable nature: he expects his desires to be respected and acts accordingly. Granddaddy Cain acts as if he has the authority to order the men off the land, and he backs up that authority with his actions.

When the hawk's mate attacks everyone in its grief, Granddaddy Cain simply fells the bird with a well-aimed throw of his hammer. The hammer brings the hawk's mate down. What this does is demonstrate to the trespassers that Granddaddy Cain will do whatever it takes to protect his property and his family. Furthermore, it's just plain unnerving to engage in conflict with a man who has such impeccable aim.

So, the men hand over their camera to Granddaddy Cain because they are afraid of him. If the accuracy of his aim is anything to go by, Granddaddy Cain isn't the kind of man who tolerates fools gladly. So, the men barely manage a weak protest after Granddaddy Cain destroys their camera. They then take their leave because they are too afraid to stay to demand restitution for their loss. In the end, Granddaddy succeeds in reclaiming the upper hand after demonstrating that he will do whatever is necessary to defend his family and property.

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In Toni Cade Bambara’s “Blues Ain’t No Mockingbird” Granddaddy walks into the conflict as he returns to the farm from the surrounding woods.

Granny attempts to use her sarcasm and the silent treatment on the men from the county but they continue to film. Finally, she retreats into her kitchen and the men start walking away but continue filming. Her comments reflect her seething anger but she does not represent an authority figure to the men.

When Granddaddy arrives Granny says, “Get them persons out of my flower bed, Mister Cain.” Her agitated demeanor is well known to Mr. Cain. At the same time, a hawk is buzzing the farm looking for his mate that Granddaddy killed. In a quiet show of strength, Mr. Cain aims and throws his hammer striking down the hawk. Next, he grabs the camera and quietly asks the men to get out of his wife’s flowerbed. After giving the broken camera back, the men shove off. Because of Granddaddy’s stoic, imposing strength, they get the message and back off the property trying to save the film in the camera.

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