Why does Ginsberg question Lorca’s presence by the watermelons?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

There is no significance to the mentioning of watermelons, except that it is a continuation of supermarket items (e.g., peaches, avocados, tomatoes) that Ginsberg has previously mentioned in the same stanza. However, the inclusion of Federico García Lorca is itself significant, because both Lorca and Ginsberg (both famous writers) had...

Unlock
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Start your 48-Hour Free Trial

There is no significance to the mentioning of watermelons, except that it is a continuation of supermarket items (e.g., peaches, avocados, tomatoes) that Ginsberg has previously mentioned in the same stanza. However, the inclusion of Federico García Lorca is itself significant, because both Lorca and Ginsberg (both famous writers) had relationships with other men. Ginsberg likely feels a kind of kinship with Lorca because of this. Lorca was persecuted in Spain during his time and was executed by anti-republican rebels during the Spanish Civil War. The inclusion of Federico García Lorca in the same stanza that features typical American middle-class families shows that Ginsburg and the imaginary Lorca seem out of place. These are two literary geniuses, yet they are doing the same mundane domestic things that traditional American families are doing: shopping for fruits and other items in a suburban grocery store.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team