Why does Gillian go to Old Bryson?

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In "One Thousand Dollars ," Gillian receives an inheritance of one thousand dollars from his late Uncle. As an added requirement, however, he is expected to spend that money, while collecting receipts for those expenditures. This is to serve as a record which he is to return to his...

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In "One Thousand Dollars," Gillian receives an inheritance of one thousand dollars from his late Uncle. As an added requirement, however, he is expected to spend that money, while collecting receipts for those expenditures. This is to serve as a record which he is to return to his Uncle's lawyers.

Gillian's frustration, however, is that he is not quite sure how to spend that money. He calls it "a confoundedly awkward amount." The one thousand dollars is far too much money to exhaust through typical, everyday kind of purchases, and yet it's not nearly enough money to support truly extravagant spending.

When he meets up with Bryson, Gillian tells him the story of his Uncle's will. He's come looking for Bryson's help, as he is seeking out ideas as to how to spend the one thousand dollars. However, it should be noted that Bryson is not the only person he will turn to for assistance on this matter (in the course of this story, he will later ask for advice from a cab driver and a blind man), before he discovers how he wishes to spend the money...

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