Why does George turn away from Candy?

In Of Mice and Men, George turns away from Candy and leaves the barn to dissociate himself from the killing of Curley's wife. He asks Candy to wait a few minutes before raising the alarm so that he will not be implicated.

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George turns away from Candy after discovering the corpse of Curley's wife and realizing that Lennie killed her. He knows that Lennie did not intend to harm the woman and tries to explain this to Candy. However, they both realize that the other men will not understand Lennie's intentions, and...

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George turns away from Candy after discovering the corpse of Curley's wife and realizing that Lennie killed her. He knows that Lennie did not intend to harm the woman and tries to explain this to Candy. However, they both realize that the other men will not understand Lennie's intentions, and Candy is certain that Curley will want him to be lynched.

George says he will ensure that no one hurts Lennie but is concerned that the other men will think he had something to do with the killing. He therefore says that he will go into the bunkhouse as though nothing has happened and asks Candy to wait for a couple of minutes before coming out of the barn and raising the alarm. He turns away from Candy to return to the bunkhouse and dissociate himself from the killing.

It is at this point in the story that both George and Candy realize that all the plans they have made for a more comfortable future will come to nothing. At this point, George understands that he and Lennie will be lucky to escape with their lives. Candy, meanwhile, after showing his resentment to George at the fact that "it's all off," vents his anger on the dead body, calling Curley's wife a "lousy tart" and blaming her for her own death.

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In chapter five, Candy enters the barn and discovers Curley's wife lying deceased on the floor. Candy is astonished by his discovery and immediately calls George into the barn. Once George enters the barn, he acknowledges the gravity of the situation and realizes that Lennie accidentally killed her. George then says that he should have known all along that things would end this way. George goes on to express his hope that Lennie will be treated fairly for his crime but Candy informs him that Curley will surely seek revenge by torturing Lennie.

When Candy tells George that maybe they can still purchase a small place on their own, George turns away from him and Candy proceeds to hang his head. George's reaction indicates that their dream is completely ruined and he feels ashamed for giving Candy false hope. In a way, George feels responsible for the entire situation and regrets including Candy in on his hopeless dream. George proceeds to tell Candy that he knew their dream was impossible from the first time they spoke about it.

He then explains what he plans on doing with the money he earned on the ranch and confirms that he will continue traveling from farm to farm working jobs without saving money. After George acknowledges that their dream of owning an estate and living off the land is ruined, he heads back outside and tells Candy to call him back into the barn so that he will not be blamed for the death of Curley’s wife.

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