In Of Mice and Men, why does George get angry with Lennie after they arrive in the clearing?

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Unlike George, who is consciously aware of his environment, Lennie is unaware of his surroundings and his behavior in general. Upon entering the clearing, Lennie almost walks over George. After entering the clearing, Lennie and George come to a pool and Lennie plops himself down and begins to drink...

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Unlike George, who is consciously aware of his environment, Lennie is unaware of his surroundings and his behavior in general. Upon entering the clearing, Lennie almost walks over George. After entering the clearing, Lennie and George come to a pool and Lennie plops himself down and begins to drink too fast. George scolds him because he doesn't want Lennie to get sick. George scolds Lennie quite a bit in this novel. At times, it is out of exasperation. But most of the time, George is just trying to get through to Lennie to make sure he doesn't hurt himself or someone else. George is frustrated with Lennie because they had to leave their last job prematurely. George is also frustrated because he has to continue to repeat their plans for the future:

"That ranch we're goin' to is right down there about a quarter mile. We're gonna go in an' see the boss. Now, look- I'll give him the work tickets, but you ain't gonna say a word. You jus' stand there and don't say nothing. If he finds out what a crazy bastard you are, we won't get no job, but if he sees ya work before he hears ya talk, we're set. Ya got that?"

Since Lennie forgets, George feels compelled to continue telling him not to talk and to avoid any chance of an awkward social situation.

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The first scene of Of Mice and Men serves as the exposition to John Steinbeck's novella of the social plight of the disenfranchised men of the Great Depression. Into a quiet clearing outside Soledad, two solitary men enter, the larger one following the other man in the shuffling, lumbering gait of a bear. After they set up camp, George Milton, the smaller man, cooks three cans of beans on the fire made from wood gathered by Lennie.

"There's enough beans for four men," George said.
Lennie watched him from over the fire. He said patiently, "I like 'em with ketchup."

Angrily, George informs Lennie that there is no ketchup, complaining that whatever Lennie wants, they do not have. He then launches into a tirade about how much trouble Lennie is and how he could get along so much better without him.

"I got you! You can't keep a job and you lose ever' job I get. Jus' keep me shovin' all over the country all the time. An that ain't the worst. You get in trouble. You do bad things and I got to get you out.....You keep me in hot water all the time."

This angry complaint foreshadows what occurs later in the narrative as Lennie does, indeed, get them into "hot water" with Curley when he crushes the shorter man's hand and on the ranch when he inadvertently breaks the neck of Curley's wife, who has flirted with him, asking him to touch her silken hair as she taunts him in the barn when all the other men are gone to town. 

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