Why does Faber consider himself a coward?

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In part 3, Montag visits Faber to receive help comprehending the texts that he has been reading. Initially, Faber tells Montag to leave him alone but ends up letting him enter his home after he realizes that Montag is not a government agent. Faber then proceeds to call himself a...

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In part 3, Montag visits Faber to receive help comprehending the texts that he has been reading. Initially, Faber tells Montag to leave him alone but ends up letting him enter his home after he realizes that Montag is not a government agent. Faber then proceeds to call himself a coward because he never stood up to the oppressive regime or challenged the authoritative government when they began censoring literature and burning books. Instead of taking a stand and attempting to undermine the government, Faber simply "grunted a few times and subsided." Before Faber knew it, it was too late to do anything. Faber also shows Montag a tiny two-way communication device that he developed but was too afraid to use against the government. Faber refers to the green bullet as proof of his "terrible cowardice." Overall, Faber considers himself a coward because in his heart he knew that the right thing to do was to challenge the oppressive regime, but he was too afraid to take a stand or undermine the fireman institution. Fortunately, Montag offers Faber an opportunity to redeem himself by helping him fight the authoritative government by preserving and spreading literature.

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Faber considers himself a coward because he had the intelligence and the foresight to see where society was headed but didn't speak out. In his refusal to stick his head above the parapet, Faber was by no means alone, but he still feels that he shirked his responsibilities to himself, to society, and to the great treasures of Western civilization which are now being consigned to the flames.

Even after the government introduced censorship and started burning books, Faber still wouldn't do anything about it. He isolated himself from the rest of society and kept himself to himself, somehow hoping that he'd be left alone. But he's come to realize that, as well as being an act of cowardice, his self-enforced isolation won't save him in the long-run. At some point, the government will eventually catch up with him, and he knows it. The time for faint hearts is over; now Faber must show courage in standing up to this authoritarian regime. Fortunately, he does, with the able assistance of Montag.

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Hello! 'Fahrenheit 451' is a phenomenal short story about censorship and freedom of expression. Montag first sees Faber in a city park; Faber is afraid of Montag and suspicious of his motives at first. When he starts to relax in Montag's presence, the retired English professor quotes some poetry to Montag. Later, when Montag asks Faber how many copies of the Bible, Plato and Shakespeare there are left in the country, Faber refuses to tell him and declares that there are none left.

Because of Faber's fear, he does not speak up about the way society is changing before his eyes. Before the firemen started the burning of books, there were signs along the way that matters were coming to a head, but Faber still didn't speak up and he tells Montag that he is a coward for not doing so. When the structure was created to start the burning of books, Faber says that he only "grunted a few times and subsided, for there were no others grunting or yelling with me, by then." Later on, he shows Montag his creation: a two-way radio transmitter no larger than a .22 bullet. He calls this invention proof of his cowardice. He will be able to guide Montag through difficult situations with this two way radio, but if anything happens to Montag, Faber tells him that he himself will still be safe at home, tending his fright "with a maximum of comfort and a minimum of chance."

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