Why does Euclio give away his pot of gold to Lyconides in The Pot of Gold?

Euclio gives away his pot of gold to Lyconides as thanks for his returning it. In a fit of joy and relief, Euclio also gives Lyconides his blessing to marry his daughter Phaedria.

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Euclio's prized pot of gold, the most important thing in the world to this stingy old miser, has been stolen by Lyconides's slave. He committed the theft because he wanted to please his master. At the same time, he also wanted to gain revenge on Euclio for giving him a...

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Euclio's prized pot of gold, the most important thing in the world to this stingy old miser, has been stolen by Lyconides's slave. He committed the theft because he wanted to please his master. At the same time, he also wanted to gain revenge on Euclio for giving him a good hiding for trying to steal the gold.

Lyconides didn't order his slave to steal Euclio's gold. In fact, when he finds out about it, he's not best pleased. So he orders his slave to go and fetch the stolen pot and bring it to him. The slave reluctantly does so, and Lyconides is now in a position to return Euclio's most prized possession.

He duly does so. And when Euclio sees his pot of gold, he's overjoyed. So overjoyed, in fact, that he gladly consents to Lyconides getting married to his daughter Phaedria, who is already pregnant by Lyconides.

The pot of gold, one would think, would be more than enough for a good dowry, an amount of money or property brought by a bride to her marriage in traditional cultures like the one depicted in Plautus's play. So Euclio has an additional reason to celebrate the return of his beloved pot of gold.

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