Why does chapter 7 illustrate that no justice exists for the "perfect wife" in The Women's Room?

In chapter 7 of The Women's Room, Mira says, "There was no justice, there was only life." Mira also says there was no way to "make up for the past." She's referring to her past with Norm. She was "perfect." She looked good, kept her kids fed, and didn’t rebuke her husband. Mira realizes there is no way to compensate for thinking that she could live a life through someone else. Instead, she focuses on her current life and freedom.

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In chapter 7, Mira has moved to Cambridge. She is thinking about her former life and her identity and how it contrasts with the younger people of Cambridge. By the end of the chapter, Mira declares, "There was no justice, there was only life. And life she had."

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In chapter 7, Mira has moved to Cambridge. She is thinking about her former life and her identity and how it contrasts with the younger people of Cambridge. By the end of the chapter, Mira declares, "There was no justice, there was only life. And life she had."

How does Mira arrive at that conclusion? We should probably understand what Mira means by "justice." When she employs the term "justice," she thinks of it as "a way to make up for the past."

For Mira, nothing can make up for her past. There is not an act or gesture that can compensate for what happened during her marriage. Why? Perhaps that's because Mira feels like she herself willfully entered into her past life with Norm. She wasn't forced. She agreed to live that life. As the narrator says, "The terms were clear and she had accepted them."

As the narrator tells us, Mira adhered to those terms perfectly. She didn't abuse her children. She made sure they weren't dirty or hungry. She "kept her figure" and never rebuked Norm for staying out late with friends. What did Mira receive in return for her perfection? A divorce.

Although, we should probably note the fact that it's not like Mira was head-over-heels infatuated with Norm. She calls him a "figured-head husband."

What she seems to be more frustrated with is that she once believed that "she could have a life only through another person." There can be no justice for that belief. It's intangible and abstract.

Mira also sees positivity in the injustice of her former married life. She tells us how that life led her to liberation. It “freed her."

What seems to concern Mira more is not justice but life. It’s not about the past anymore. It’s about the present and her current freedom.

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