Why does Camus includes in the story of the Czech family in The Stranger, and how does this relate to Meursault?

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The primary character in The Stranger by Albert Camus is Meursault, who is the embodiment of author Camus’s views of existentialism: try though we might to imbue our lives with meaning, life essentially has none other than merely to exist. Thus, any attempt to associate actions or occurrences with meaning or to expect rationality is absurd. Meursault makes no attempt to find meaning in his life and the characters around him who try to see meaning in his actions fail to find any.

Camus includes a newspaper story about a family in Czechoslovakia to further convey this. The segment allows Camus show Meursault’s reaction to the newspaper story.

The very opening of The Stranger reveals that Meursault's general emotional state is characterized largely by indifference. His primary desires revolve around satisfying his fundamental bodily needs: to eat, to sleep, to relieve himself and to fulfill his sexual needs. For this reason, there is a lot of description in the book about these actions.

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