Why does Aylmer detest Georgiana’s birthmark in "The Birthmark"?

In "The Birthmark," Aylmer detests Georgiana's birthmark because he feels it ruins her otherwise perfect beauty.

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Aylmer grows to detest Georgiana's birthmark, shaped like a tiny hand in the center of the left side her face, because he believes it mars her otherwise perfect beauty:

No, dearest Georgiana, you came so nearly perfect from the hand of Nature that this slightest possible defect, which we hesitate...

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Aylmer grows to detest Georgiana's birthmark, shaped like a tiny hand in the center of the left side her face, because he believes it mars her otherwise perfect beauty:

No, dearest Georgiana, you came so nearly perfect from the hand of Nature that this slightest possible defect, which we hesitate whether to term a defect or a beauty, shocks me.

He says it would not bother him so much if on a less attractive person—and he feels he might even find it charming in such a case—but

seeing her otherwise so perfect, he found this one defect grow more and more intolerable with every moment of their united lives.

The narrator calls the birthmark evidence of nature's way of always adding a touch of imperfection to every natural form. However, as a scientist, Aylmer believes he can improve on nature, bending it to his will and making it perfect.

Because he has "sombre" imagination, he becomes obsessed with the birthmark. It magnifies in his mind until it is "frightful" to him and seems to obliterate the rest of his wife's beauty.

This obsession reveals that Aylmer has a strong desire for control. He is an idealist who finds it impossible to be satisfied with imperfection. Worse, he is utterly convinced of his power as a scientist to achieve perfection over nature, in this case by cutting away the birthmark from his wife's cheek. When Georgiana is finally distressed enough to ask her husband if something can be done, he is ready for her, saying:

I feel myself fully competent to render this dear cheek as faultless as its fellow; and then, most beloved, what will be my triumph when I shall have corrected what Nature left imperfect in her fairest work!

He is, as he states, interested primarily in showing he can triumph over nature. In trying to make his wife flawless, however, Aylmer ends up killing her, showing the arrogance of trying to achieve perfection.

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