Why does Annette Brougham feel obligated to appreciate Alan Beverly’s painting?

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In Wodehouse's story, "The Man Upstairs," Annette has several reasons for praising Mr. Beverly's painting. First, he has been kind to her about the songs she writes and tries to sell. Second, like many people, she has a taste for paintings of cats and children like the one he shows...

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In Wodehouse's story, "The Man Upstairs," Annette has several reasons for praising Mr. Beverly's painting. First, he has been kind to her about the songs she writes and tries to sell. Second, like many people, she has a taste for paintings of cats and children like the one he shows to her as having just painted. We learn that:

Annette belonged to that large section of the public which likes or dislikes a picture according to whether its subject happens to please or displease them. Probably there was not one of the million or so child-and-cat eyesores at present in existence which she would not have liked. Besides, he had been very nice about her music.

'I think it's splendid,' she announced.

She further defends Mr. Beverley's painting because finds him charming, and she finds the painter Mr. Seller's critique of Mr. Beverley's work patronizing and insufferable. Mr. Sellers has had no success himself as a painter, except for doing advertisements, and yet he takes it on himself to lecture and be pompous about Mr. Seller's shortcomings as an artist. This drives Annette crazy. It even drives her to the point of secretly purchasing the cat painting, not knowing that at the time that Mr. Beverley is really a rich man who doesn't need the money.

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