Why does an uncrowded country club golf course have aspects of a public good?According to my Economics Text book, uncrowded country club golf courses are a public good.  I am trying to determine...

Why does an uncrowded country club golf course have aspects of a public good?

According to my Economics Text book, uncrowded country club golf courses are a public good.  I am trying to determine why they are a public good if they are uncrowded and what happens if they become crowded and the games are slowed down.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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A public good is one where the provider cannot exclude anyone from enjoying the good (it is nonexcludable).  It is also one in which consumption of the good is "nonrival," meaning that one person's consumption does not prevent another from consuming the good as well.

The uncrowded country club golf course has one of these aspects.  When it is uncrowded, the consumption of the good is nonrival.  If the golf course is uncrowded and I go to play there, it will not prevent you from playing.  There are many tee times available and so we can both play.  If the course were crowded, this would no longer be the case.  There would be many fewer tee times and therefore the good would lose much of its nonrival aspect.

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