Why does "A Red, Red Rose" use simile?

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Generally, a writer uses similes to enable the reader to imagine in his mind what the writer is saying. This is why a writer compares one thing to another with which the reader is familiar. The speaker compares his love to a red rose that has just bloomed. We are...

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Generally, a writer uses similes to enable the reader to imagine in his mind what the writer is saying. This is why a writer compares one thing to another with which the reader is familiar. The speaker compares his love to a red rose that has just bloomed. We are all familiar with a rose, so we are able to better understand the comparison. Most people are awed by the beauty of a "newly sprung" rose, so we can understand how the speaker feels about his love. He also compares to "the melodie/That's sweetly played in tune". Again, music is universal, so we can all understand how the speaker feels. We can imagine how we feel when we hear a beautiful piece of music played. It sends chills over us, and this lets us comprehend the speaker's feelings.

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The simile is a literary device that is used to make a comparison using the word "like" or "as." Burns is writing a love poem to his sweetheart, and what is more lovely than a rose? And what represents love better than a red rose?

Why use a simile? Maybe Burns thought a metaphor ("my luve is red, red rose") wouldn't make sense. To say simply "My luve is really pretty" just isn't poetic. We just have to leave it to poetic license.

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