Why do you think Rainsford chooses to confront Zaroff in the end, rather than simply ambush him?Why do you think Rainsford chooses to confront Zaroff in the end, rather than simply ambush him?

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hilahmarca's profile pic

hilahmarca | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

I agree with #3.  He wants Zaroff to feel like he's being hunted.  Rainsford has now tracked him down and his him on an even playing field.  Zaroff is now the one who has to fight to stay alive.  Aside from this, I think an ambush would be pretty difficult.  Rainsford is unarmed and Zaroff is tucked away somewhere in his great chateau.  A sneak attack probably wouldn't be successful.

ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I agree with Aunt Lori. Rainsford was a sporting hunter, and it would not have been as satisfying to take unawares. There was probably a grim satisfaction for Rainsford when he stared Zaroff in the eyes and Zaroff new his most dangerous game was coming to an end, and this time he would be the loser.

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Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

All good points.  I'd only add that Rainsford is a hunter with some integrity--in other words, he would not be the guy who used unfair means to kill his prey (like some modern big cat hunters who, for example, shoot tigers and lions virtually undefended while held captive in their pens just to say they killed a wild cat).  He wanted to face his foe, give him the same fighting chance he would give any prey, make sure Zaroff knew it was him, and derive the satisfaction of knowing his enemy was aware of who killed him and why. 

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Sanger Rainsford is not a murderer, and by allowing General Zaroff a chance to survive the hunt, this time as the prey, he keeps his own fair-minded humanity intact--and proves who is the greater of the two hunters.

tthusing's profile pic

tthusing | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

Personally, I feel that Rainsford stops to have the breif discussion with Zaroff because he wants to make one very important point clear: He is not killing Zaroff as a man but as an animal.  Rainsford still believes that what Zaroff is doing is wrong.  He wants to clarify that he has not sunk to Zaroff's level by killing another man.  He wants to express the point that he is still an animal being hunted that is defending himself, not a man who is commiting murder.

amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

That's a great question.  I think it comes down to the fact that every time a wrong is done, a crime is committed, people want to the know the "why".  Rainsford has suffered a horrible experience.  The fear and panic he felt must have been overwhelming.  Of course, he wants an answer where there probably is no answer...some psychopaths have no idea why they do what they do.  They only know they get a rush from being in power over someone else and causing pain. 

mrtaylor's profile pic

mrtaylor | High School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

By ambushing Zaroff, Rainsford wouldn't have the satisfaction of making Zaroff surrender or congratulate him for winning, after all, Rainsford did win the Most dangerous Game

sushrruti's profile pic

sushrruti | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

ransiford wants tell  zarooff killing is bad and also he wants general zaroof to feel like him when he was hunted.

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