Why do you always give use so much homework to do?Somtimes we can't do that much homework in one day.

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amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I understand your frustration.  Homework is given to assess whether or not the students in the class understand the concepts introduced.  In some cases, for instance, math class, this can be shown by doing the odd problems 1-20 (ten problems) rather than all 20 problems.

It's a little harder to assess writing in English without having you do the writing.  Perhaps you could write just the introduction or just the conclusion or just the outline of the paper to show your organization skills and thought process.

Much of what I find as a teacher is not that too much homework is given, but that students do not always use their time wisely while at school.  Especially younger students, whose maturity level has not yet met with their physical and intellectual capabilities.  If this is not true for you...if you feel you are organized and use your time wisely at school (balancing both the social and academic aspects) then perhaps you should discuss the issue with your teachers?  It might be that they do not know other teachers are assigning so much work or that there is a test scheduled in two classes on the same day.  It doesn't hurt to ask!

Don't give up!  Get organized, take good notes, form study groups, and get help when you need it before you find you're struggling to keep up.  You will do fine, and I think you'll find that most teachers are willing to work with you if you approach them in a sensible, non-accusatory, mature manner.

Good Luck!

herappleness's profile pic

M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Agreed. I am a teacher but I am going to play "devil's advocate" on this one because I am also a parent and I hate to see the frustration.

If you ever find yourself with way too much homework, you are entitled to go to your teacher and ask her the following questions:

1. How much time is she going to allot for you to complete the task.

2. What exactly is the teacher going to evaluate? Ask for a rubric. You are entitled to see what exactly the teacher will be grading.

3. Ask yourself: Does this homework have anything to do with what I learned this week? If not, go to your counselor or request a teacher/student conference with the teacher and the counselor.

4. Represent! Take signatures from students who feel the same way, go to the ASB, Student Council, and intelligently document how this might affect the students.

When I was your age, I entered my school's student council and it was GREAT to vent these frustrations with the powers that be, instead of other students. It was a chance to help my voice be heard.

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