Why do think that the Romans admired Horatius so much?

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Horatius, more commonly known in English as Horace, became a major literary figure of the Augustan Empire in Rome (27 BCE–14 CE) and enjoyed a special relation to the emperor Octavianus. Originally a supporter of Brutus in the Civil War, after the Republican defeat at Filippi (42 BCE), Horace became...

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Horatius, more commonly known in English as Horace, became a major literary figure of the Augustan Empire in Rome (27 BCE–14 CE) and enjoyed a special relation to the emperor Octavianus. Originally a supporter of Brutus in the Civil War, after the Republican defeat at Filippi (42 BCE), Horace became progressively closer to the emperor, whose cultural establishment encouraged his literary career.

Horace was appreciated because his works embodied the ideals of Pax Romana and the policies of the empire. In the Odes, for example, the thirty-seventh poem of the first volume is a vigorous attack on the Ptolemaic queen Cleopatra, who had sided with Antony in the attempt to overthrow the Roman Empire, and a celebration of the moral and military virtues of the Roman emperor. The content is reinforced by the formal craft, with the initial repetition (called anaphora) of "nunc" to convey joy over the queen's death.

Horace's works, in general, never challenge the empire and its leaders. In addition, even Horace's more satirical works very rarely target individual people, focusing instead on general behaviors and human faults such as ambition and intolerance. When Horace does target individuals in his satire—such as his literary mentor, Maecenas—his tone is humorous but gentle. This should not be seen merely as the poet's willingness to bow to the political leaders of the time but also as a way of understanding human nature. It is significant that a great number of Horace's sentences have become common usage in Western cultures (e.g., "seize the day," or carpe diem).

Also, Horace's literary models satisfied the literary canon of the Augustan Age, which looked back to the Greek tradition of symmetry, balance, and polished imagery. Horace was able to use traditional Greek literary themes and forms, adapting them to the political and cultural context of the Roman Empire.

Horace's success was, then, due to the poet's ability to understand the new social and political milieu and interpret it in his works. In addition, Horace was able to combine classic Greek literary forms with the themes dear to the emperor, such as how to exercise virtue in a changing society, the celebration of the state, and the celebration of the deeds of leaders to maintain peace and prosperity.

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