Why do Proctor and Rebecca speak out against Hale's coming in The Crucible?

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Proctor and Rebecca understand that when the search for witches begins it will be difficult to control. Rebecca suggests that if they are going to actively search for a solution, the town should do so as a whole. 

"...send Reverend Hale back as soon as he come. This will set...

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Proctor and Rebecca understand that when the search for witches begins it will be difficult to control. Rebecca suggests that if they are going to actively search for a solution, the town should do so as a whole. 

"...send Reverend Hale back as soon as he come. This will set us all to arguin' again in the society, and we thought to have peace this year." 

She goes on to say that town should look to doctors and to God for a solution to the problem of the girls. The divisions within the town are immediately evident in the room, proving that Rebecca's concerns are realistic. 

As she and Proctor speak against bringing in Hale to begin a literal witch hunt, Mrs. Putnam voices her anger at her bad luck and points a finger at Rebecca with vague blame even before Hale has arrived to "confirm" the presence of witchcraft. Proctor is also attacked for his church attendance and he fires back at Parris with his criticism of Parris selfishness and lack of reverence for God. 

Proctor and Rebecca see that bringing a divisive figure into town can only make things worse that are already bad.

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I don't believe the text tells us why directly, but certainly lets us infer why as the play proceeds. Initially, it seems that both John Proctor and Rebecca Nurse do not believe that these issues being discussed regarding Betty Parris' recent struggle with her health have much to do with witchery, but more with hype and raising havoc.

Rebecca believes calling on Reverend Hale will just begin again much division in the town... it would bring about accusations of who is witched and who isn't. Rebecca is the voice of reason as she insists that yes, relying on a good doctor and strong prayer is a valid path to recovery for this young girl.

Proctor is also reading between the words of the Putnams. He sees that they are trying to influence the new Rev. Parris and he thinks they are using their hefty land ownership to do it. Proctor also notes that Rev. Parris himself seems to be swaying of late.

Hale is an alarmist who brings with him great "knowledge". At this point, this sweet little town needs some common sense and both of these folks recognize it.

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