Why do I have to subscribe to read more then what is given?

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psyproffie's profile pic

psyproffie | College Teacher | (Level 3) Assistant Educator

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eNotes.com is a comprehensive online educational resource. Used daily by thousands of students, teachers, professors, and researchers, eNotes combines the highest-quality educational content with innovative services in order to provide an online learning environment unlike any other.

Membership is required to receive full answers written by trained professionals and instructors as this is similar to a paid tutoring service. The website's material mainly focuses on literature and history, though the company offers a variety of different topics within the humanities. A network of over 1,000 teachers and professors contributes much of the content. It is different from other online subscription education services in that an in-house publishing team edits uploaded works mainly for grammar and formatting. Materials range from expert to questionable. With its subscription model, the company bootstrapped its way to profitability and claims about 750 new sign-ups on a weekday during the school year. According to internet analytics firm Quantcast.com, the site is accessed by more than 7,000,000 unique visitors each month.

chrisyhsun's profile pic

chrisyhsun | Student, College Freshman | (Level 1) Salutatorian

Posted on

As a student, I can understand this sentiment. However, looking at the situation from the perspective of the business, it is immediately clear why paid subscription systems are necessary - to earn revenue. It costs the business money to run a system with so many users and added content everyday. Money is needed to keep the system running, and paid subscriptions are a way to do that.

Nevertheless, it is important to give people a taste of the service before asking for money. As such, you are allowed access to some content first to give you an idea of what you would be paying for, and then you can make the choice to get a subscription (and thus access to all the content) based on your impressions.

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