Why do the children's attitudes change towards him? Remember the description of Boo Radley at the end of chapter 1- long jagged scar, malevolent phantom etc. Is it because he becomes more real to them?

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Scout's change of attitude is described near the beginning of Chapter 26. She realizes that the children's games "must have been sheer torment for Arthur Radley," and she feels ashamed. But she remembers also the gifts that were left for them in the tree. Finally, she fantasizes about how she might some day see Boo on the porch, and greet him with, "Hidy do, Mr. Arthur." This shows that with time, she has outgrown her picture of a hideous monster lurking about at night.

Jem 's viewpoint has changed, too; walking to the Halloween party he laughs about the silly games they...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 315 words.)

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