Why did the Giant's heart melt upon seeing the children in "The Selfish Giant"?

In "The Selfish Giant," the Giant's heart melts because he realizes that he needs to share his garden with the children to keep it beautiful and green. He acknowledges that he has been selfish and is glad to see the children playing in his garden again.

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In Oscar Wilde 's short story "The Selfish Giant," the Giant puts walls around his garden to keep the children from playing in it, because he wants to keep the beauty of the garden all to himself. He is hard hearted and selfish. However, his heart melts when he sees...

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In Oscar Wilde's short story "The Selfish Giant," the Giant puts walls around his garden to keep the children from playing in it, because he wants to keep the beauty of the garden all to himself. He is hard hearted and selfish. However, his heart melts when he sees children in his garden again, realizing that it was the presence of the children that kept his garden lush and beautiful. Without them, winter has taken hold of his garden, and no birds sing and no trees blossom, because there are no children there to make them happy and enjoy them.

Once the children sneak in, the garden erupts into springtime again. The Giant sees this and realizes how selfish and coldhearted he has been, and his heart, like the winter that has beset his garden, melts and is made new again. He comes out to help the children and uses his axe to dismantle the wall that he had built to keep them out. He realizes he must share his garden for it to have any value, and as he grows older, he acknowledges that "the children are the most beautiful flowers of all," more precious than those in his garden.

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