Why did Texans fight for their independence from Mexico?

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Tensions ran high between Texas and Mexico in the 1830s, starting with Mexico's decision to close their border to more American immigrants. Eventually, Mexicans and Texans saw eye-to-eye on very little.

Slavery was against Mexican law, for example, which distressed Texans who ventured south to acquire cheap land and make...

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Tensions ran high between Texas and Mexico in the 1830s, starting with Mexico's decision to close their border to more American immigrants. Eventually, Mexicans and Texans saw eye-to-eye on very little.

Slavery was against Mexican law, for example, which distressed Texans who ventured south to acquire cheap land and make it big growing cotton. Texans—most of whom were raised Protestant—also struggled with the idea of becoming Catholic, even though they'd promised to do so. Texans didn't like that their official documents were in Spanish, either, and they really didn't like that Mexico imposed stiff taxes on American goods in an attempt to get Texans to stop buying so many American products and buy more Mexican goods.

The real tipping point was states' rights, though, which were favored by many Texans. Texas wanted to be its own state within Mexico, but Mexico refused. Santa Anna's attempt to grab more power for the central government by ending the Constitution and installing himself as dictator, therefore, sent Texans over the edge. The Mexican government bore an unsettling resemblance to the British government under King George, leaving Texans no choice but to rebel.

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