Why did Rosh want to capture the slave in The Bronze Bow? What does the author mean when she says 'there was a wordless exchange that was both a farewell and a beginning between the two boys?' Do...

Why did Rosh want to capture the slave in The Bronze Bow?

What does the author mean when she says 'there was a wordless exchange that was both a farewell and a beginning between the two boys?'

Do you agree that Daniel's tactic of caring for the slave is a good way to get Rosh's attention? What other methods might he have used to gain Rosh's attention?

Asked on by kjtk

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teachsuccess | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Due to his size and capacity to be physically useful to the band of Zealots, Rosh thinks that Samson (the slave) would prove a valuable addition to his arsenal of manpower.Indeed, as time progresses, Samson would prove his worth by aiding in the completion of tasks previously a challenge for the group.

Joel's eyes met his in a brief salute, and between the two boys, something flashed, a wordless exchange that was both a farewell and a beginning.

The two young men bid farewell to each other, but the parting will only be temporary. The author has foreshadowed Joel's future role in the Zealot mission by intimating that this farewell is only the beginning of more interaction between Daniel and Joel. Joel's earlier assertion to Daniel that he wants to join Rosh's group and his subsequent brief interview before Rosh tells us that we will be seeing more of Joel's character and that he will play a central part in the story's plot.

As for whether Daniel's tactic of caring for the slave proves a good way to get Rosh's attention, we know that Daniel initially thought it was. After the ambush, Daniel claims responsibility for the slave's welfare when no one else wants to step up to the job. Daniel does this partly because he feels jealous of the attention Rosh appears to show Joel, despite the latter not having performed any particularly impressive feat. At least, that's what Daniel concludes about Joel's awkward attempt to help during the ambush.

Daniel is soon to regret taking charge of Samson because Rosh orders him to file off Samson's chains that very night. Daniel thinks that he has been given the physically taxing job only because of his training as a blacksmith. As for Rosh, the author portrays this character as a man who solely concerns himself with objectives and outcomes, as pertaining to the Zealot mission. As such, the men who follow him are merely physical tools he will use to attain both rudimentary and far-reaching goals in the mission to expel all Romans from Israel. While Daniel may have initially thought that taking charge of the slave and seeing to his needs would impress Rosh, it is doubtful whether the leader would care to agree.

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