Why did Roger kill Piggy?

In Lord of the Flies, Roger kills Piggy because the opportunity presents itself and because Roger's cruelty has, over the course of the novel, advanced to the point that he can murder another boy without thinking twice.

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To put it bluntly, Roger kills Piggy because he can. From the beginning of the time the group of boys are stranded on the uninhabited island, Roger showcases his cruelty, and it is apparent that becomes even more cruel as he grows accustomed to the lack of societal structures and...

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To put it bluntly, Roger kills Piggy because he can. From the beginning of the time the group of boys are stranded on the uninhabited island, Roger showcases his cruelty, and it is apparent that becomes even more cruel as he grows accustomed to the lack of societal structures and authority.

By the day of Piggy's murder, Roger has lost all his former inhibitions that prevented him earlier from throwing stones directly at little Henry on the beach. While Roger is standing high on Castle Rock, he watches Piggy standing below, making his speech. Piggy, as one of the last boys to hold on to his sanity and social scruples, is speaking about logical matters such as the importance of rescue and of law and order. Such matters are in stark contrast to the way of life that Roger wants to pursue as a member of Jack's tribe, and it is with an alarming level of enjoyment that he sets a boulder rolling down the mountain and watches it crush and kill Piggy. He would likely be overjoyed to note that his action also crushes the conch shell, which has been used, with ever-decreasing success, to maintain a sense of order among the boys.

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