Why did the pigs in Animal Farm become like the humans in the end? 

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The humans in the story are separate from the animals on the farm. In a way, this separation and difference is the human's most important characteristics. This distance in culture (ways of dressing, ways of walking, etc.) also takes the form of an emotional distance. When the humans do not...

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The humans in the story are separate from the animals on the farm. In a way, this separation and difference is the human's most important characteristics. This distance in culture (ways of dressing, ways of walking, etc.) also takes the form of an emotional distance. When the humans do not feel a connection with the animals, they are willing to treat the animals very poorly and as lesser creatures without rights. 

Over the course of the story, the pigs lose their connection with the other animals on the farm. Though they begin as comrades and equals with the other animals, they end up being "more equal" than the other animals on the farm, superior and emotionally distanced. 

...in the novel's last scene, Pilkington chokes with amusement as he says to the pigs, "If you have your lower animals to contend with, we have our lower classes."

When the pigs begin to feel that they are no connected with the other animals on the farm and can treat them as if they have no rights, the pigs have become like the humans. 

Why do the pigs become disconnected from the other animals on the farm? This is one of the central comments of the novel. The answer relates to the dangers of political power. Power corrupts. 

Orwell knew that with power came the abuse of power and only a vigilant citizenry could prevent such abuses.

The pigs separate themselves from "the citizenry" and become elevated figures. Literally drunk and also drunk on power, the pigs participate in forming a hierarchy that serves them and that offers nothing but disservice to others. 

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The pigs become like the humans by the end of the story as throughout the story they have revealed similar traits; they want to seize power and maintain control over all the other animals.This is exactly what the humans always did, and the pigs, in effect, take over from the humans and rule in just the same oppressive manner. In this way they wholly destroy the original ideals of the revolution which called for complete equality for all animals and the rejection of all human contact. By the end of the story the pigs are in open alliance with the humans and behave just like them, even walking on two legs like them. This is why they end up appearing quite indistinguishable from the humans.

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As with everything that happens in the story, this is meant to be an allegory of the Soviet Union. In Russia, the Bolsheviks—like the pigs on the farm—came to power promising to free the workers from poverty and exploitation. As they consolidated their rule, however, they subjected the working people of Russia to even greater measures of tyranny, suffering, and exploitation than they had ever experienced under the Tsars.

In Animal Farm, the Animalist revolution—like the Bolshevik one—starts off with high hopes by proclaiming a new society in which the animals can look forward to a golden future of leisure and prosperity free from human exploitation. It does not quite turn out like that, however, because Napoleon establishes a brutal, murderous dictatorship just like Stalin did in the Soviet Union. By the end of the book, the pigs have become so much like their former human oppressors that it is hard to tell them apart. For the working class in Russia, it was difficult to detect much difference between the ruling Communist government and the Tsarist autocracy it replaced.

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Orwell was obviously using the farm to stand in for the Soviet Union, Napoleon for Stalin, etc. And the point of the pigs becoming more and more human-like was meant to show the evolving relationship between the Soviets and the rest of the Allies during World War II. Just as the revolution that began with great hope for changing the lives of the average Russians changed over time and was co-opted by the Soviet leadership into a system that robbed the average man of nearly everything in order to keep a group of administrators and autocrats in power and wealth, the pigs on the farm demonstrate this shift in their becoming more and more human.

By the end of the story, the "lower animals" can no longer tell the difference between the pigs and the humans and this correlates to the alliance between the Soviets and the Allies at the end of WWII where the Allies agreed to basically look the other way as Stalin murdered millions of his own people and were complicit in this action. 

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