Why did Numa initially turn down the kingship of Rome?

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Here are Numa's exact words (according to Plutarch):

His reply, therefore, in the presence of his father and one of his kinsmen named Marcius, was as follows. "Every change in a man's life is perilous; but when a man knows no lack, and has no fault to find with his present lot, nothing short of madness can change his purposes and remove him from his wonted course of life, which, even though it have no other advantage, is at least fixed and secure, and therefore better than one which is all uncertain.

But the lot of one who becomes your king cannot even be called uncertain, judging from the experience of Romulus, since he himself was accused of basely plotting against his colleague Tatius, and involved the patricians in the charge of having basely put their king out of the way. And yet those who bring these accusations laud Romulus as a child of the gods, and tell how he was preserved in an incredible way and fed in a miraculous manner when he was an infant. But I am of mortal birth, and I was nourished and trained by men whom you know.

Moreover, the very traits in my disposition which are to be commended, are far from marking a man destined to be a king, namely, my great love of retirement, my devotion to studies inconsistent with the usual activities of men, and my well-known strong and inveterate love of peace, of unwarlike occupations, and of men who come together only for the worship of the gods and for friendly intercourse, but who otherwise live by themselves as tillers of the soil or herdsmen.

Whereas, unto you, O Romans, whether you want them or not, Romulus has bequeathed many wars, and to make head against these the city needs a king with a warrior's experience and strength. Besides, the people has become much accustomed to war, and eager for it because of their successes, and no one is blind to their desire for growth by conquest. I should therefore become a laughing-stock if I sought to serve the gods, and taught men to honour justice and hate violence and war, in a city which desires a leader of its armies rather than a king."

If you wanted to boil it down to one thing—he didn't think he had the personality or desire necessary to be king. Consider the line: "My great love of retirement, my devotion to studies inconsistent with the usual activities of men, and my well-known strong and inveterate love of peace..."

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According to Plutarch's The Life of Numa, after the death of Romulus (the first king of Rome), the feuding supporters of Romulus and Tatius eventually agreed to crown Numa king.

However, Numa initially turned down the offer of kingship for a few reasons:

1) He was happy living a quiet life.

2) He was greatly devoted to academic pursuits.

3) He appreciated a peaceful existence, one in which his acquaintances came together to worship deity or to engage in friendly conversation.

4) He reasoned that the people were much accustomed to having a war-like king, such as Romulus was. He argued that he would have a hard time living up to Romulus' strong reputation for war and conquest. Additionally, he felt that he would become a laughing-stock among his subjects if he were to preach against the violence and war that has accorded Rome all its manifest power.

5) He asserted that the fortunes of a king seem to be predicated on the political winds of change. Numa gives the example of Romulus, who was accused of plotting against his colleague, Tatius, king of the Sabines. Yet, Romulus was greatly believed to be a 'child of the gods.' Indeed, Numa believed a king's position and power to be tenuous at best.

Moreover, the very traits in my disposition which are to be commended, are far from marking a man destined to be a king, namely, my great love of retirement, my devotion to studies inconsistent with the usual activities of men, and my well-known strong and inveterate love of peace, of unwarlike occupations...

Besides, the people has become much accustomed to war, and eager for it because of their successes, and no one is blind to their desire for growth by conquest. I should therefore become a laughing-stock if I sought to serve the gods, and taught men to honour justice and hate violence and war, in a city which desires a leader of its armies rather than a king.

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