Why did the New Deal come to an end?

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In some ways, one can argue that the New Deal never ended.  Many aspects of the New Deal became permanent parts of our society.  We still, for example, have Social Security and the FDIC and other programs that either started in the New Deal or were created (like Medicare) to...

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In some ways, one can argue that the New Deal never ended.  Many aspects of the New Deal became permanent parts of our society.  We still, for example, have Social Security and the FDIC and other programs that either started in the New Deal or were created (like Medicare) to expand on the ideas of the New Deal.

If you want to say that the New Deal ended in the late '30s, though, there are two main reasons why it did.

First, there was the fact that many in Congress and many in conservatives in general were starting to push back against the New Deal.  In 1938, for example, Republicans made significant gains in the Congressional elections, showing that there was significant anti-New Deal feeling in the country.

Second, the coming of crises and eventually war in Europe and Asia took the attention of the country and the government away from domestic programs.  As the Roosevelt Administration had to concentrate more on foreign affairs, it stopped pushing so hard for domestic reforms.

If you are going to argue that the New Deal ended in the '30s, these are the most important reasons why it did.

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